Are cannabis companies allowed to advertise?

The Cannabis Control and Licensing Act regulates who can promote cannabis to sell it. Only people who have a marketing license or a retail store license can promote and sell cannabis to adults age 19 and older in B, C.

Are cannabis companies allowed to advertise?

The Cannabis Control and Licensing Act regulates who can promote cannabis to sell it. Only people who have a marketing license or a retail store license can promote and sell cannabis to adults age 19 and older in B, C. Article 17 of the Act provides for limited exceptions to some of the promotion prohibitions. Specifically, it allows persons authorized to sell and produce cannabis (and accessories) to carry out information promotions (i.e.,.

Factual information about cannabis and accessories, such as prices) and the promotion of brand preferences (i.e.,. Brand characteristics (linked to the products), as long as a young person under the age of 18 is not reasonably aware of the advertisements. However, the exception does not apply, among other things, to sponsorship, installation or incentive prohibitions. Article 16 of the Act states that promotional prohibitions do not apply to a report, commentary, opinion article, or to any literary, dramatic, musical, cinematographic, scientific, educational or artistic work, production or performance, if such use or representation is not taken into account.

In addition, the prohibitions do not apply to specific categories of promotion within the industry, provided that the promotion is not directed, directly or indirectly, at consumers. The delivery service cannot be provided or offered as an incentive to purchase cannabis or a cannabis accessory. A person authorized to produce, sell or distribute cannabis is limited to a holder of a federal license, a provincial or private retailer authorized under subsection 69 (of the Cannabis Act), or a person who has been granted a legislative or regulatory exemption. Under the Food and Drug Act, health products that contain cannabis or for use with cannabis are subject to pre-marketing authorization by Health Canada.

This does not include packaging or labeling, as they are included in other provisions of the Cannabis Act and the Cannabis Regulations. Cannabis marketing services are weaker in this regard because the advertising options on cannabis packages are non-existent. In addition to the Federal Cannabis Act, provincial and territorial governments may adopt legislation relating, among other things, to the promotion and application of cannabis. See subsections 17 (b), 26 (a), 27 (a) and 31 of the Cannabis Act, as well as the Policy Statement on the Prohibitions of the Cannabis Act, which refers to appealing to young people, for additional information on compliance with the prohibitions relating to appealing to young people.

With the long-awaited legalization of cannabis in Canada, emerging cannabis marketing companies could hardly suppress smiles as they plan their advertising plans for this untapped market. The obstacles that marijuana companies still face when trying to educate the world about the best uses (and misuses) of the cannabis plant were highlighted after a United Nations panel called for a global ban on business advertising for cannabis. The marketing of cannabis in Canada, including promotions, exhibitions, cannabis labeling and packaging, cannabis accessories and related services, is severely restricted. Article 17 () of the Act broadly restricts the promotion1 of cannabis and cannabis-related services, unless authorized under the Act.

The Ontario government and the Ontario Alcohol and Gaming Commission (AGCO), which is responsible for regulating Ontario's retail cannabis stores, have published laws, regulations and guidelines related to the promotion of cannabis in Ontario. You may not promote cannabis and its accessories in a false, misleading or misleading way. The Cannabis Act contains a general prohibition of false, misleading, or misleading promotions in relation to cannabis, including its characteristics, value, quantity, composition, concentration, potency, purity, quality, merit, safety, health effects or health risks (or similar claims about cannabis) accessories, including their design, construction, performance, intended use, characteristics, value, composition, merit, safety, health effects or health risks). Therefore, a publication, signage, or radio broadcast that includes promotions under the Cannabis Act and is accessible to the general public may not comply with the Cannabis Act.

You cannot sell or distribute cannabis or a cannabis accessory through a screen that allows self-service or through a dispensing device. . .

Cooper Lavoie
Cooper Lavoie

Wannabe tv evangelist. Avid tv junkie. Infuriatingly humble beer guru. Amateur zombie guru. Hardcore tea nerd.